death at sea—she's hooked.

Sep 26

i already plowed through five six out of eleven of the books i borrowed from liberry and i guess that’s really pretty enough for one day, but i think i am going to keep going forever

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sometimes i get messages to review things on goodreads and i like to think it’s because of excellent reviews like this

sometimes i get messages to review things on goodreads and i like to think it’s because of excellent reviews like this

Sep 25

borkn:

me and noelle saw so many qt cats 2day tbh

SO many cats they were all so precious i miss them so much

(Source: infinite--tenderness)

the library is such a good place to me

the library is such a good place to me

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“Gloria J. Gibson provides the most insightful pieces of research into the Gists’ life, particularly Eloyce’s. According to Gibson, Eloyce Gist was born in Texas in 1892, with Washington, D.C. becoming her home not long after the turn of the century. She attended Howard University. Eloyce’s thinking about religion is said to reflect her own beliefs in Baha’i and that of James, her Christian self-ordained evangelist husband. Eloyce worked in partnership with her husband, and his contributions to their filmmaking are undisputed, if not precisely known. However, the silent film Hellbound Train is viewed as being significantly Eloyce’s as the script is largely hers, as are several scenes which she arranged the shooting of. The Gists made films, not for entertainment, but as a teaching tool to aid in their ministry. The duo traveled from Black church to Black church, by auto, with their films and equipment. When Gibson interviewed Eloyce’s 82-year-old daughter, Homoiselle Patrick Harrison, in the early 1990s, Harrison recalled how the couple screened their films: Eloyce would play the piano and lead the congregation in hymns. Then, the film would be shown, followed by a sermonette by James Gist. Tickets were either sold in advance, or a collection was taken at the close of the service, with the Gists and the church splitting the money. The Gists’ films were well received, even drawing the attention of the NAACP in 1933, when the organization contacted the couple to offer their endorsement of the efforts.

[…] After the death of her husband, Eloyce continued to tour, “traveling with the films, a projector, and an assistant for a while, but soon realized she couldn’t shoulder the diverse responsibilities alone. The work of programmer, manager, and exhibitor was too taxing.” More, sound had made the silent film obsolete, making way for efforts such as [Spencer] Williams’. Eloyce died in 1974. The magnitude of her accomplishments can be measured today by the condition of her films. According to the Library of Congress, showing the films so often took their toll: “The movies were so widely shown that they literally fell apart along the splices and were received by the Library in hundreds of short fragments.”” — Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror films from the 1890s to Present, Robin R. Means Coleman

Sep 24

Film Studies For Free: New CINEPHILE 8.2 on Contemporary Extremism -

Extreme cinema has since evolved in a number of exciting directions, extending its cultural reach. As an indication of its cultural relevancy, for instance, the latest edition of the Oxford Dictionary of Film includes an entry on “extreme cinema (ordeal cinema),”…The inclusion of the alternate term, “ordeal cinema,” is important for the emphasis it places on the role of the spectator, “who commits to watching a film that will take them through a horrendous experience in what seems like real time.”

(Source: chrryblssmninja)

TMI alert tmi tmi don’t read tmi warning TMI

i was just attending to some business (masturbating) and no sooner did i finish did someone come aknockin’ at my door and it was both the goddamn ups delivery man AND maintenance what the HELL this is the worst porn of my life.

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Sep 22

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Mermaids, 1990, Richard Benjamin

Mermaids, 1990, Richard Benjamin

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(via urbean)

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